Inspiration

Discover the Gardens of East Yorkshire

Burton Agnes Hall and Gardens, Driffield - Burton Agnes Hall is a beautiful Elizabethan stately home with award-winning gardens offering; manicured lawns with more than a hundred yew topiary bushes and classical pond with a fountain and a pebble mosaic garden, Elizabethan walled garden containing three thousand different plants, a potager filled with herbs, fruit and vegetables, herbaceous borders, maze, jungle garden, a National Collection of campanulas and a woodland walk with wildlife sculptures. Winner of the 2005 HHA Christies Garden of the Year.

Sewerby Hall & Gardens, Bridlington - Situated in a dramatic clifftop position and set in 50 acres of early 19th Century parkland, the Hall with its deep-rooted heritage enjoys spectacular views across Bridlington Bay. The magnificent multi award-winning gardens offer something for everyone and are among the best in the region including walled gardens, pleasure gardens and for golf lovers a 9-hole pitch and putt golf course, 18-hole putting green, FootGolf and Crown Green Bowling. Our WorkLink centre also hosts around 30 adults with learning disabilities, the centre gives them an opportunity to grow and sell plants at various times throughout the year. Not forgetting our very own Zoo, Adventure Playground and the Clock Tower Tea Rooms.

Sledmere House, Driffield - Jealously guarded, but hard not to share, the atmosphere is informal, the landscape breathtaking and the welcome warm and friendly. Gardeners, antique and architecture lovers, walkers, bird watchers, military enthusiasts, photographers, painters and music buffs all seem instantly at home. ‘Capability Brown' inspired landscape, 18th century hexagonal walled garden Parterre and rose garden. Free entry to the Terrace Café, Gift Shop, Exhibition Room and Wagoners' Museum. Please see website for admission prices to the House and Gardens and for information of our Gold Card scheme.

Burton Constable Hall and Grounds, near Hull - Small areas of formal gardens with decorative borders and clipped yew trees surround this magnificent Elizabethan mansion, but the real delight is the 330 acre grade II* historic parkland – one of the best-documented examples of a landscape worked by England’s greatest gardener, Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown. Today the Hall and Park are owned by a charity and since 1999 a comprehensive programme of parkland restoration has been in place. Built features including the 18th century Orangery and Brown’s bridge have been restored and the park is now grazed by a variety of rare-breed cattle and sheep – which add a final touch to Brown’s beautiful landscape.