Inspiration

Bucket List Holidays in Yorkshire

Collect moments, not things. Bucket List holidays are set to be one of the top trends for post-lockdown escapes. Yorkshire has plenty to offer travellers who want to go big on their trips of a lifetime.

Stargaze at the National Parks

The Yorkshire Dales and North York Moors National Parks have been designated International Dark Sky Reserves. They are home to some of the darkest skies in the country, with large areas of unpolluted night sky where it’s possible to see thousands of stars, the Milky Way, meteors and even the Northern Lights.

Yorkshire 3 Peaks


Hike 24 miles and climb over 5,000 feet across the Yorkshire three peaks route one of the greatest and most rewarding challenges in the UK. You’ll take on Pen-y-ghent (694m), Whernside (736m) and Ingleborough (723m), and trek through the heart of some of the UK's most incredible scenery, including the famous Ribblehead Viaduct.


Descend into Gaping Gill


The largest caving area in the UK is right here in (well, below) Yorkshire. There are 2,000 caves and potholes, plus more than 400km of surveyed passages. This summer why not don your hard hat and discover Yorkshire’s unique geology in all its glory?

Feed the Lions at YWP


Experience the thrill of coming face to face with some of the world’s most incredible and deadly mammals. Encounter African Lions, Amur Tigers and critically endangered Amur Leopards like never before during this fantastic experience at Yorkshire Wildlife Park.

Malham Cove Pavements


Malham Cove is a huge curving shaped cliff formation of limestone rock. The vertical face of the cliff is about 260 feet high. The top of the cove is a large area of deeply eroded limestone pavement, of a strange pattern rarely seen in England. The majestic scenery was even used in the Harry Potter film franchise, during The Deathly Hallows Part One proving there is certainly something magic about this area.

Explore the Sculpture Triangle


Covering 200 different exhibitions across four different venues, the Yorkshire Sculpture Triangle is the sculpture capital of Europe. It is made up of four leading arts venues; The Henry Moore Institute, The Hepworth Wakefield, Leeds Art Gallery and Yorkshire Sculpture Park, all of which are located within a 30 minute distance from each other. Yorkshire has a special connection with sculpture with two of the most important English sculptures hailing from here; Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore.

Discover the magic of the Shambles


Shambles is one of the best-preserved medieval shopping streets in Europe. Although none of the original shop-fronts have survived from medieval times, some properties still have exterior wooden shelves, reminders of when cuts of meat were served from the open windows. The street was made narrow by design to keep the meat out of direct sunlight. Today, the beautiful old buildings have been restored and now house cheerful cafes and quirky boutiques

Hike the Cleveland Way


The Cleveland Way National Trail has continued to offer wonderful walking experiences for over 50 years. Many walkers consider it as a classic route because of the variety of landscapes through which it travels. The first half of the 109 miles is spent crossing the North York Moors National Park, including great sweeping vistas from the heather moorlands across the Vales of Mowbray and York.

Fine Dining at a Michelin Starred Restaurant


Yorkshire now boasts the largest number of Michelin Starred restaurants than any other county in England outside of London. The magnificent 7 that make up Yorkshire's Michelin Star experience include The Black Swan in Oldstead, Roots, The Pipe and Glass, The Man Behind the Curtain, The Angel at Hetton, Shaun Rankin at Grantley Hall and The Star Inn.

Theatres in Sheffield


Did you know that the largest Theatre District outside of London is right here in Yorkshire? Sheffield Theatres is home to the world-famous Crucible, Lyceum and Studio. Across it’s 3 theatres, the company produces a diverse programme of work so it’s a perfect place to visit for a night of culture.

Visit the home of Dracula


Over 125 years ago, a man by the name of Bram Stoker visited the stunning seaside town of Whitby and left with an idea that would change literary history forever. Inspired by the gothic charm of the town, Stoker went on to write one of the most famous horror novels of all time in the form of Dracula. Climb the 199 steps to the romantic ruins of Whitby Abbey where the most famous vampire of all time took refuge.