Places

A rich architectural legacy

As you wander around Bradford city centre, you can't help but notice there are beautiful old buildings at every turn. And where better to start than 500 year old Bradford Cathedral, situated on the edge of the city's historical heart. A few steps more and you'll reach Little Germany, named after the 19th Century European merchants who came here. And there's more Victorian architecture to admire in the form of the Grade I listed Wool Exchange.

A more privileged history

If you'd like to spend a little time exploring a different side of Bradford, then go to Bolling Hall. Just a mile outside the city centre, here you'll discover the lives and times of the Bradford families who called it home for over 500 years. Every nook and cranny is packed with history through the centuries, including Cromwell's Death Mask. But can you spot the White Lady in the Ghost Room?

Museums of peace and industry

Back in the city centre sit a wealth of museums, containing different snapshots of Bradford's colourful history. The Peace Museum is unique to the UK and, as the name suggests, charts non-violence and conflict resolution. Bradford Industrial Museum has innovative displays of textile machinery, steam power and engineering.

Proud Jewish Community

Bradford has a proud history. It was the wool capital of the world (a trade which originated in Yorkshire in the 14th century, based on the Cistercians and their superior woolly sheep), and part of the cradle of the Industrial revolution - a city full of 'Yorkshire grit'. These are some of the titles that apply to Bradford. However, at first glance the Jewish connection to Bradford seems a strange one. While the Leeds and Manchester Jewish community grew as part of the migration of Russian Jews escaping from tsarist Russian persecution in the 1880s and 90s, Bradford was part of an earlier settlement from the 1820s onwards, part of a commercial venture of Germans, both Jewish and Gentile. German Jews who came to Bradford from the 1820s onwards, came not to seek freedom from persecution, but to build businesses and fortunes. They did much to shape Bradford and to create its wealth and fame. They were passionately concerned in the building of Bradford and helped change a small town into a major commercial city. They made an indelible mark on its industrial as well as cultural and charitable life.