Places

The Dales never fails

Malham is a small village, in the Pennines, at the southern base of the Yorkshire Dales. It's a pretty place, surrounded by limestone dry-stone walls, & with a stream running right through the middle of the village.

Mentioned in the Domesday book as 'Malgun', Malham has been a settlement for at least a thousand years. Traces of Iron age boundaries are still visible today. One hundred years ago, Malham was a place of mills and mines. Nowadays, hill farms and tourism are the main activities.

Malham Cove and Gordale Scar

Once a glacier, this limestone pavement was created as the water melted. Climb the steps to the top and you'll be rewarded with amazing views of the valley below.

Malham Cove is a huge curving shaped cliff formation of limestone rock. The vertical face of the cliff is about 260 feet high. The top of the cove is a large area of deeply eroded limestone pavement, of a strange pattern rarely seen in England. The majesty of Malham Cove looks out over the Village of Malham and has been attracting visitors for centuries. For climbers, it is a grand amphitheatre with great mid-grade trad routes to the hardest sport climbs in the country. Malham is popular all year round with climbers and walkers alike. The Cove is a SSSI, so special care should be taken when visiting.

More recently Malham Cove has also starred in the Harry Potter film franchise, during The Deathly Hallows Part One. There's certainly something magic about this place.

Nearby, Gordale Scar is a spectacular gorge, complete with waterfalls, cut right into the limestone hillside. The gorge was produced by water from melting glaciers sometime over the last three million years. Gordale Scar is one of the highlights of a visit to Malham.

Malham Tarn

A popular Dales beauty spot set amid rolling hills and rugged moorland. This outstanding area of limestone pavements, upland hill farms and flower-rich hay meadows provides a marvellous setting for walking, cycling or just enjoying the great outdoors.

Malham Tarn National Nature Reserve is a beautiful place to visit, especially during the summer when the flowers and dragonflies are in abundance. There is something for everyone here, and it changes throughout the seasons so one visit is never enough.

Inspiring Artists

As well as Turner, Malham has inspired artists and writers such as Ward, Wordsworth and Kingsley, with its stunning cliffs, crags and scars. Standing some 80 metres high and 300 metres wide and north of the mid craven fault, Malham Cove is a curved crag of carboniferous limestone formed after the last ice age.

Turner visited Malham Cove twice: in 1808, when making a visit to the Craven Dales area where he sketched around Ingleton and Malham, and again in 1816 during his extensive tour of Yorkshire. On both occasions he appears to have put up at nearby Malham.