Attraction

Overview & description

Holy Trinity Goodramgate has the air of a hidden treasure. It stands in a small, secluded, leafy churchyard, with the Minster towering behind, tucked away behind Goodramgate - one of York’s busiest shopping streets. To visit, you pass through an 18th-century archway tacked on to buildings that served as artisans’ workshops in the 14th century.

The church itself is full of character. The floors and arcades are charmingly uneven. Light filters through the windows, illuminating honey-coloured stone. The east window especially has marvellous stained glass that was donated in the early 1470s by the Reverend John Walker, rector of the church. On sunny days, transient gems of coloured light are scattered on the walls, and various Medieval faces stare out from the windows.

The building dates chiefly from the 15th century, but has features from its foundation in the 12th century right up to the 19th century. The box pews, unique in York, are exceptionally fine, and an interesting collection of monuments and memorials paint a picture of life in this busy city throughout the ages.

Holy Trinity contains seventeenth-century box pews. Each family would rent a pew annually supplying their own embroidered cushions & kneelers, highlighting both the family’s wealth and skill of the ladies. The high sided pews provided privacy and signalled ownership and status.

Two boards, with heads shaped like grandfather clocks, record the names of Lord Mayors of the city, including George Hudson, ‘The Railway King’, who made York a major railway centre in the 19th century.

Outdoor benches make the churchyard the perfect place for reflection, offering a welcome retreat from the hectic world outside.

Closed: New Year, Good Friday, Easter Monday, May Day, May Bank Holiday Monday, August Bank Holiday Monday, Christmas and Boxing Day.

Read more

Prices

Type Price
Group Tours £0.50