Event

Overview & description

Light, Mood and Atmosphere features beautiful evocative landscape paintings by artist Nicole Dickinson, exhibited alongside the unique shapes and glazes of Howard gardener's ceramic forms.




Nicole’s inspiration comes from her love of nature. She is especially attracted to the rugged countryside of the north of England where she lives and its coastlines. Her paintings depict moods and atmospheres created by the ever-changing English weather. The quality of light is a vital part of the mood of her work.
She likes walking in the countryside especially on the moors with her camera and sketchbook and then painting intuitively in her studio. Her main objective is to translate her emotional response to a moment in time.
She finds oil paint a wonderful medium which brings depth, luminosity and transparency to a painting.
Nicole also enjoys experimenting with acrylic, watercolour, collage and mixed media. She likes building up texture and depth with several layers of paint which she often partially rubs or scrapes back in order to leave some of the lower layers exposed. She finds canvases, wooden boards and strong papers suitable for this rough treatment.
Her landscape paintings are mainly semi-abstract. She likes to create works that are more suggestive and atmospheric than descriptive. The intention is to let the viewers connect with her work through their mood and memories.





Howard's work is mainly produced in stoneware using a variety of ceramic techniques. He uses clay slips and glazes from a combination of tried and tested recipes. The thrown and hand built original pieces are influenced by a variety of historical ceramic connections. His interests include classical Greek, Roman and Chinese ceramics as well as Twentieth Century Studio pottery.
The current work exhibited is the result of studying both Roman and Greek Amphora vessels.
In most parts of the Mediterranean there are examples of Amphora, meaning a' two handled carrier'. Containers like these were made from local clays and were the common method of transporting goods such as wine, oil and olives throughout Europe and the world. The popular shapes enabled easy transportation in the bottom of ships. The small base and full body of the amphora allow them to be easily stacked and transported across the sea. There are many designs and shapes produced and many lay at the bottom of the sea.
How did other civilisations actually make these wonderful pots? Howard has created pieces in which the aesthetic shapes show the delicate balance between shape, form and line.
Experimentation with clay slips and oxides in conjunction with a variety of glazes enhances the final surface, reflecting light and capturing the mood and atmosphere of these ancient vessels
The work in this exhibition is only the beginning of a long-term project making connections with the past.

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Tickets Free